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China Matters documents the Down-to-earth Smart Life in Tianjin

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From having sports to mobile payment to seeing a doctor online, we have been overwhelmed by a one-screen-and-one-click lifestyle.

But what if they have turned smart altogether?

In Tianjin Binhai New Area, a subordinate city in the town has been trying to make everything intelligent living here.

Obtaining sports data from a smart runaway, charging mobile phones from a solar bench, or seeing a doctor through smart devices---they are not just too good to be true but more of a down-to-earth life experience.

As a joint project of the two countries, China Singapore Tianjin Eco-City aims at bringing an environment-friendly and resource-saving life to its inhabitants.

In this 8-minute video, British resident Josh showcases one day of his “smart life” in the Eco-City located 150 kilometers from Beijing.

In the morning, he could run in a smart track that is equipped with facial recognition technology and multiple sensors. They can capture his heart pulse as well as his gender and age, and give him a customized result of his running performance.

After having sports, Josh would take an electric self-driving bus to go around the city. These buses recognize traffic lights and emergency on the road, then they react immediately. In the afternoon, he usually reads at the China-Singapore Friendship Library, where robots help him look for books and get books returned.

Contact: Li Siwei

Tel:008610-68996566

E-mail:lisiwei5125@gmail.com

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bz4a51fNu4Y

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